“A New Dream” is the third album from Idaho-based pianist and composer Lynn Tredeau. Having received her first piano at the age of six and subsequently mastering classical music, Lynn eventually found her calling in the realm of new age piano music when she later discovered the music of fellow pianist-composer Michele McLaughlin. Following in the musical footsteps of her two previously award-nominated albums, “A New Dream” is comprised of thirteen solo piano compositions that are largely inspired by dreams, musings and memories.

April 2016 playlists for our weekly one-hour programs

Composer and multi-instrumentalist, Michelle Qureshi, creates an enthralling blend of musical styles on her album “Scattering Stars”. A classically trained guitarist with an interest in Sufi mysticism, Michelle’s studio consists of acoustic, electric, classical, and 12-string guitars, as well an array of synthesizers, indigenous world and exotic percussive instruments. Her musical influences include the likes of Pink Floyd, Mike Oldfield, Pat Metheny, Ennio Morricone, Michael Nyman and Philip Glass among others, as the compositions on “Scattering Stars” emit echoes of her many artistic inspirations throughout.

“In the Garden” is the fourth release from Seay (pronounced ‘say’) – a highly gifted musician, composer and singer who plays piano and keyboard, as well as provides all vocals on this album. Produced, arranged and written by Seay, she is joined by other musical talents that include Rob Beaton, Leon Bisquera, Butto, Erik Darken, Jules Delgado, Scott W. Hallgren, Varsha Gowda, Ricky Kej and The Raevolution Orchestra, Wouter Kellerman, Karthik K, Geoff Koch, Stephen Peppos, Jeff Silverman, Jonathan Smith, Bret Teegarden, Pat Thomi, Vanil Veigas, Jerry Watts Jr and Hitoshi Yamaguchi.

“Zia” is the debut album by Alexi Musnitsky, a young pianist born in New Mexico and currently living in Paris. Having played piano since age four with a formal background in classical training, Alexi began composing his own music when he was eighteen. Produced by Will Ackerman along with Tom Eaton and Alexi Musnitsky, and recorded at Imaginary Road studios in Vermont, the album is named after the indigenous Zia tribe of New Mexico. Cellist Eugene Friesen is featured on several of the compositions, while Tom Eaton lends subtle percussion and bass to three of the seven tracks.

“Radio God” is Get Tribal’s follow-up to the award-nominated debut, “God of Drum”, a globally-inspired project by composer Kari Hohne. Drawing upon world mythologies and diverse cultures, as well as inspiration from music and films spanning several decades, she weaves these concepts into a blend of both ancient and modern rhythms within an electronic musical framework.

“Southern Cross” is the follow-up to electronic music composer Jim Ottaway’s highly energetic “Invisible Vortex” album. Named for a distinctive constellation in the Southern Hemisphere, “Southern Cross” is Jim’s first intrinsically ambient-space album since “Liquid Moon”, which was originally released in Australia in 2011, and later internationally in 2014. Comprised of six tracks spanning seventy minutes total, the album was recorded, mixed and mastered by Jim, as well as lovingly dedicated to the memory of his mother Madge who passed away in 2015.

Darren Rogers’ “Interstellar Love” is based upon a theme of two soulmates in search of one another as they behold the celestial night sky. Consisting of seven compositions spanning fifty-two minutes, the album explores the hidden depths and desires of the heart – and how it potentially relates to a greater cosmic design.

“Distant Horseman” is the fifth album from composer and keyboardist Timothy Wenzel. A former research scientist with a chemistry background, the music of Timothy is inspired by his fascination with both the musings of life and the physical world around him. Joining Timothy on this album on all but two of the twelve compositions is violinist Josie Quick – also a member of the groups Perpetual Motion, The Coyote Poets of the Universe and the Frontera String Quartet.

Few things are as delightful as when a truly remarkable ambient-electronic album crosses my path, and listening to Keith Richie’s “Ambient Highways” is about as sublime as it gets. Visually interpreted by what just may be the coolest album artwork I’ve seen in a while, “Ambient Highways” takes the listener on a fascinating voyage from start to finish. Although not derivative, notable comparisons can be drawn to Tangerine Dream, Christopher Franke, John Carpenter, Vangelis and Carbon Based Lifeforms, all of whom Keith cites as musical influences.

RSS feed

Listen 24/7 @ 320k

 

 

Click here for playlist history

 


Licensed to play with SOCAN

Subscribe

Sign up for our newsletter to receive the latest updates.

FOLLOW

Twitter -- http://www.twitter.com/journeyscapes_ Facebook -- http://www.facebook.com/journeyscapes

Support